Thursday, July 2, 2015

JWS ranked highly in the 2015 Google Scholar Metrics data



Google released its 2015 Google Scholar Metrics data, which estimates the visibility and influence of journals and selected conferences based on citations to articles published in 2010-2014.

The primary measure is the h5-index, defined for a publication venue as the largest number h such that h articles published in it in the last five years have at least h citations each. A related measure, h5-median is also computed as the median number of citations for the articles that make up its h5-index.

The Journal of Web Semantics 2015 h5-index was 36 and its h5-median was 56, putting the journal at 14th in the Google-defined  Databases and Information Systems category and 17th among all venues whose names contain one of the words web, semantics, knowledge, intelligence or intelligent.



Sunday, June 21, 2015

JWS 2014 impact factor increases to 2.55 (Thompson Reuters)


Thomson Reuters released their  2015 Journal Citation Report which shows that the Journal of Web Semantics impact factors has risen to 2.550 and its five-year impact factor has increased to 2.464.

The new impact factor ranks the JWS 11th out of 123 journals in the Computer Science, Information Systems category, 21st out of 121 journals in Computer Science, Artificial Intelligence and 4th out of 104 journals in Computer Science, Software Engineering.

Thomson Reuter's impact factor for a given year is the ratio of the citations to a journal from  in that year to a count of articles published in the journal in the prior two years. Only citations from selected journals are used in the Thomson Reuters metrics.

Tuesday, March 17, 2015

JWS special issue on stream processing



The Journal of Web Semantics invites submissions to a special issue on Stream Processing to be edited by Monika Solanki and Jean-Paul Calbimonte. Submissions are due by 1 July 2015.
Processing data streams is one of the main challenges facing today’s decentralised and distributed systems, given the high dynamicity, heterogeneity and volume of real-time data generated by contemporary IT infrastructures. The application domains where streams play a central role include social networks, smart cities, mobile wearable sensors, internet of things, environmental monitoring and stock market analysis, to name just a few. All these streams of data, or infinite flows of information, already exist and are available in pervasive and ubiquitous data-rich environments. However it remains difficult and challenging to effectively process, query and derive results from them. In the area of databases, these research challenges led to the emergence of data stream and complex event processing systems, including data models, query languages, algebra and operational semantics for them. Nevertheless, research opportunities in this area are far from being exhausted. The imminent realization of the Internet of Things and the abundance of new sources of streaming data raise a set of new challenges, especially dealing with the variety and heterogeneity of the data. Clear foundations are required to solve problems such as data integration and real-time analytics, added to the need for better understanding the meaning and the value of streaming data on the web. Several attempts have been made to approach some of these challenges using the theoretical foundations and the tools of Semantic Web research. These works have resulted in systems that tackle different issues, including continuous query processing, stream reasoning, event detection, ontology maintenance or ontology-based data access.
The goal of this special issue is to provide a grounding for research on recent advances in stream processing and their underlying semantic technologies. Traditional challenges of scalability, information quality, and data integration are of interest, but also are specific projects that publish, study, or use data streams in innovative ways. More specifically, we expect submissions on (but not restricted to) the following topics.
  • Processing RDF Data Streams
    • Producing and consuming streams of RDF graphs
    • Modelling streams of structured data
    • Theoretical modelling of RDF streams
    • Automatic annotation of raw data streams
    • Processing noisy data, uncertainty, incomplete information
    • Semantic mining of RDF data streams
    • Mechanisms for integrating historical data with streaming data
    • Publishing Linked Stream Data
  • Querying semantic streams of data
    • Extensions to SPARQL for data streams
    • Complex event processing on semantic data
    • Ontology-based data access to data streams
    • Data dynamics, update, and synchronization
    • Optimisation of stream query processing
    • Correctness of stream query processing
    • Synthetic RDF streams and benchmarking
  • Reasoning with data streams
    • New stream reasoning algorithms
    • Incremental reasoning on dynamic ontologies
    • Temporal logics for reasoning over Semantic streams
    • Multicore scalable stream reasoning
  • Applications of stream processing
    • Semantic sensor networks
    • Social network streams and microposts
    • Stream processing in the Internet of Things
    • Smart cities
    • Activity streams
    • Gamification
Guest Editors
Important Dates
We will aim at an efficient publication cycle in order to guarantee prompt availability of the published results. We will review papers on a rolling basis as they are submitted and explicitly encourage submissions well before the submission deadline. Submit papers online at the journal's Elsevier Web site.
  • Submission deadline: 1st July 2015
  • Author notification: 30th September 2015
  • Final version: 15th December 2015
  • Final notification: 15th January 2016
  • Publication: 30th January 2016
Submission guidelines
The Journal of Web Semantics solicits original scientific contributions of high quality. Following the overall mission of the journal, we emphasize the publication of papers that combine theories, methods and experiments from different subject areas in order to deliver innovative semantic methods and applications. The publication of large-scale experiments and their analysis is also encouraged to clearly illustrate scenarios and methods that introduce semantics into existing Web interfaces, contents and services.
Submission of your manuscript is welcome provided that it, or any translation of it, has not been copyrighted or published and is not being submitted for publication elsewhere. Manuscripts should be prepared for publication in accordance with instructions given in the JWS guide for authors. The submission and review process will be carried out using Elsevier's Web-based EES system. To ensure that all manuscripts are correctly identified for inclusion into the special issue, it is important that authors select "S.I.: Stream Processing" at the "Article Type" step in the submission process.
Upon acceptance of an article, the author(s) will be asked to transfer copyright of the article to the publisher. This transfer will ensure the widest possible dissemination of information. Elsevier's liberal preprint policypermits authors and their institutions to host preprints on their web sites. Preprints of the articles will be made freely accessible on the JWS preprint server. Final copies of accepted publications will appear in print and at Elsevier's archival online server.

Sunday, February 22, 2015

JWS special issue on Life Science and e-Science


Volume 29 of Web Semantics: Science, Services and Agents on the World Wide Web is a special issue on eLifeScience, the digital conduct and communication of research in biology and biomedicine.

The issue includes an introduction by the editors, Tim Clark and Marco Roos, and six articles that shows examples of how researchers are tackling the challenge of turning web semantics into working solutions.

Wednesday, January 28, 2015

CFP: Special Issue on Geospatial Semantics, deadline extended


Special Issue of the JWS on Geospatial Semantics


The Journal of Web Semantics seeks submissions for a special issue on geospatial semantics to be edited by Yolanda Gil and Raphaël Troncy. Submissions are due by January 31 February 16, 2015.

Geospatial reasoning has an increasingly larger scope in the semantic web. More and more information is geolocated, more mobile devices produce geocoded records, and more web mashups are created to convey geospatial information. Semantics can enable automated integration of geospatial information, and track the provenance of the data shown to an end user. Semantics can also improve visualizations and querying of geospatial data. Semantics can also support crowdsourcing of geospatial data, particularly to track identity through name and property changes over time. Several recent workshops on geospatial semantics have emphasized the interest in the community on these topics. Of note are workshops organized by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) and the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) indicating a strong interest in standardization efforts in geospatial semantics. This special issue aims to synthesize the recent trends in research and practice in the area of geospatial semantics.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:
  • Combining semantic information with more traditional representations and standards for geospatial data
  • Exploiting semantics to enhance visualizations of geospatial information
  • Use of semantics to support geospatial data integration and conflation
  • Semantic mashups of geospatial data
  • Semantic provenance of geospatial data (e.g., PROV)
  • Semantics for mobile geospatial applications
  • Geospatial linked open data
  • Managing privacy of personal geospatial data and whereabouts through semantics
  • Combining semantic web standards (W3C) with geospatial (OGC) standards (e.g., GML)
  • Format for representing geographical data (e.g., GeoJSON)
  • Semantics for crowdsourcing geospatial information
  • Semantics for exploiting geospatial information in social network platforms
  • Scalable reasoning with semantic geospatial data
  • Real world applications of semantic geospatial frameworks

Guest Editors

  • Yolanda Gil, Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California
  • Raphaël Troncy, Multimedia Communications Department, EURECOM

Important Dates

  • Call for papers: September 20, 2014
  • Submission deadline: January 31 February 16, 2015
  • Author notification: mid-April 2015
  • Publication: third quarter of 2015

Submission guidelines

The Journal of Web Semantics solicits original scientific contributions of high quality. Following the overall mission of the journal, we emphasize the publication of papers that combine theories, methods and experiments from different subject areas in order to deliver innovative semantic methods and applications. The publication of large-scale experiments and their analysis is also encouraged to clearly illustrate scenarios and methods that introduce semantics into existing Web interfaces, contents and services.

Submission of your manuscript is welcome provided that it, or any translation of it, has not been copyrighted or published and is not being submitted for publication elsewhere. Manuscripts should be prepared for publication in accordance with instructions given in the JWS guide for authors. The submission and review process will be carried out using Elsevier's Web-based EES system. Upon acceptance of an article, the author(s) will be asked to transfer copyright of the article to the publisher. This transfer will ensure the widest possible dissemination of information. Elsevier's liberal preprint policy permits authors and their institutions to host preprints on their web sites. Preprints of the articles will be made freely accessible on the JWS preprint server. Final copies of accepted publications will appear in print and at Elsevier's archival online server.

Thursday, January 15, 2015

Preprints: Special Issue on the 2013 Semantic Web Challenge


Volume 27 of the Journal of Web Semantics includes papers from a special issue from the 2013 Semantic Web Challenge edited by Andreas Harth and Sean Bechhofer. Five systems sere selected as winners, four in the Open Track, with a special Big Data Prize being awarded to the best systems making use of large-scale data sets. This special issue presents articles about these five systems.

Wednesday, January 14, 2015

2015 Ontology Summit: Internet of Things: Toward Smart Networked Systems and Societies



The theme of the 2015 Ontology Summit is Internet of Things: Toward Smart Networked Systems and Societies. The Ontology Summit is an annual series of events (first started by Ontolog and NIST in 2006) that involve the ontology community and communities related to each year's theme.

The 2015 Summit will hold a virtual discourse over the next three months via mailing lists and online panel sessions augmented conference calls. The Summit will culminate in a two-day face-to-face workshop on 13-14 April 2015 in Arlington, VA. The Summit's goal is to explore how ontologies can play a significant role in the realization of smart networked systems and societies in the Internet of Things.

The Summit's initial launch session will take place from 12:30pm to 2:00pm EDT on Thursday, January 15th and will include overview presentations from each of the four technical tracks. See the 2015 Ontology Summit for more information, the schedule and details on how to participate in these free an open events.

Wednesday, January 7, 2015

Special issue on machine learning deadline extended to 15 February 2015


The deadline for submission to the special issue on machine learning and data mining for the Semantic Web has been extended to 15 February 2015.

Important Dates

  • Submission deadline: 15 February 2015
  • Author notification: 30 April 2015
  • Submission deadline for revisions: 15 June 2015
  • Author notification: 1 August 2015

Special issue editors